Plasmonic Materials in MEEP > 1.2

Here is how I was implementing plasmonic materials in meep1.1 scheme code. Unlike Meep 1. 1, Meep >= 1. 2 changed the way materials are defined. Here I will describe how to change the material definition code from meep1.1 to meep 1.2 . Please note that one can still use the material definition written from Meep <1.2 for Meep >=1.2 but not vice versa. Installation of Meep 1.2 on ubuntu You can follow instructions given in my previous post to compile Meep 1.2 from the source code, but the procedure is outdated and one can use the recently pre-compiled meep Read More …

Parallelization in Octave using parcellfun/pararrayfun

My computer has many processors and I would like to run some octave scripts so that all the processors are being used. One can use octave function called “pararrayfun” for this purpose. This function is part of “general” package on octave-forge. On my ubuntu 11.10, I used “sudo apt-get install octave-general” to install this package and ran the following script 1; # this is kept to Prevent Octave from thinking that this is a function file: close all; clear all; function y=test(a,b) y=sin(a)+cos(b) endfunction num_process=8 a_test_inputs=[0:3.14/20:3.14]; b_test_inputs=[0:3.14/20:3.14]*2; tic (); tt_par= pararrayfun(num_process,@test,(a_test_inputs),(b_test_inputs)); parallel_elapsed_time = toc () tic (); tt_ser= test((a_test_inputs),(b_test_inputs)); serial_elapsed_time Read More …

van der Pauw correction factor

The van der Pauw Method is a technique commonly used to measure the Resistivity and the Hall Coefficient of a sample. A correction factor goes into calculating the resistivity as described in van der Pauw paper. A iterative method is generally used to calculate the correction factor and this correction factor is plotted in Figure 5 of van der Pauw paper I reproduced the same figure below using fsolve function in octave. This figure was produced by the octave code shown below. The raw data is here. %This octave/matlab code calculates the correction factor,f as a function of Rmnop/Rnopm. This Read More …

Surface plasmon dispersion relation for thin metal films

A thin metal film in dielectric (also known as dielectric-metal-dielectric configuration) can support surface plasmons that are different in nature to the ones observed in thick metal-dielectric interfaces. Unlike, a single mode that is observed in thick metal film, thin metal films exhibit two types of modes for the same wavevector due to excitation and interaction of surface plasmons on both sides of the film. One mode (L+) is at higher energy and other (L-) is at a lower energy. The high energy has anti-symmetric field distribution whereas the low energy one has symmetric field distribution. The dispersion relations of Read More …

Arbitrary 2d shapes in MEEP

In MEEP (1.1.1), dielectric structures are often created by constructive geometry (adding and subtracting primitive shapes). The primitive shapes that are allowed are blocks, cylinders, ellipsoids and cones. To create a complex shape, one has to decompose the geometry into these primitive shapes. Over the weekend, I was wondering if it was possible to somehow create any complex shape in 2d without figuring out the exact positions and operations with the available primitive shapes. Here I report how I solve this problem. The first thing I figured out was to create a 2d triangle with known vertices using a certain Read More …

Plasmonic materials in MEEP

  The aim of this post is to share my experience in incorporating dielectric function of metals such as gold and silver into MEEP (a free finite difference time domain package) code. The incorporation is not an easy task and can be daunting for the first time user. Metals such as gold and silver have both Drude and Lorentz components for the dielectric function. There are many forms of Lorentz-Drude expressions in literature with slight notation differences. I prefer the Lorentz-Drude expression mentioned in Rakic et al., Optical properties of metallic films for vertical-cavity optoelectronic devices, Applied Optics (1998) and Read More …